Bone Fracture and Softdrinks

Bone Fracture and Softdrinks
Phosphate additives are used as flavor stabilizer in all popular cola beverage sold in the United States. Non cola carbonated beverage use citric acid rather that phosphates for this purpose. Several investigators have suggested that consumption of cola beverages and the associated decline in milk consumption may decrease bone density, particularly in children and young women.

In one study in 2000 from shows that the active teenage girls who drink cola beverages had a fracture risk 4.94 times higher than girls who denied drinking cola beverages, even if those other girls drank non-cola carbonated beverages. This finding appeared to confirm and extend previous findings indicating that consumption of cola beverages predicted high fracture risk in teenage girls. However all the studies relied on questionnaires and self-report: none included any dependent measure of cola beverage consumption or bone density, nor was any attempt made to confirm that girls who believed that they had sustained a broken bone had actually done so.

Researchers have suggested that the increased risk of fracture associated with consumption of cola beverages is not a result of anything in the beverage itself, but is rather due to the displacement of other foods and beverages such as milk.
Bone Fracture and Softdrinks

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